JP Morgan: What The Next Financial Crisis Will Look Like

by | Sep 20, 2018 | Headline News | 8 comments

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    JP Morgan’s senior analysts, Marko Kolanovic, has come out with what he thinks the next financial crisis is going to look like. Kolanovic explained his prediction and reasoning in a report issued earlier this month, in which he believes a precipitous decline in stocks could cause the Great Liquidity Crisis.

    According to Kolanovic, as reported by Forbes, the rise of passive investing and algorithmic trading could create the backdrop for a substantial stock market drop. Then we would experience severe stock price declines, lightning fast machine selling, and some aggressive action by central banks.

    The approximately $2 trillion shift from active to passive investing has removed individual buyers who can buy the market after significant price declines.

    According to Kolanovic, 90% of daily trading in the stock market is from index and quant funds. Quant funds, he writes, are programmed to sell market weakness – rather than analyze fundamental valuation, for example.

    Similarly, electronic trading desks tend to sell when the market falls, which removes additional liquidity from the market. –Forbes

    Kolanovic did say that it isn’t possible to pinpoint exactly when the next financial crisis will occur, but he also added that he sees no reason for a massive problem until the second half of 2019. He did warn, however, that massive amounts of consumer debt will compound an already delicate problem.

    United States consumers collectively hold more than $1 trillion in each of mortgage debt, student loan debt, and credit card debt.  Those numbers are staggering.  According to the latest student loan debt statistics from Make Lemonade, there are over 44 million borrowers who collectively owe $1.5 trillion in student loan debt. This now makes student loan debt the second highest consumer debt category – second only to mortgages.

    That debt means that any small uptick in interest rates could result in the default of bills, exasperating the crisis.

    “It is all about taking money from us and transferring it into government pockets. And then, taking money from government pockets, and transferring it into the hands of the elite. It’s a game that’s been going on for generations and its time for the humanity to say that ‘enough is enough’.” -Epic Economist

    Kolanovic’s warnings sound like those of many others. The coming financial crisis will be brutal and unavoidable.  All we can do is take measure to make sure our assets are protected and be aware of the small changes in the market that will signify the crash is oncoming.

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      8 Comments

      1. the blame-e

        JP Morgan is the financial crisis. What does the financial crisis care what the financial crisis looks like?

      2. Maranatha

        Plus they are worried about derivatives.

        This is why there has been serious talk since 2007 about a currency and debt reset for either Western Civilization or the entire world starting about 2012 and beyond.

        It’s often called a jubilee.

        They are so worried, that they would do a slow reset in stages or do a massive hit where the debt is erased. But there willbe a terrible catch as there always is. It will have worldwide support and bipartisan support in the USA.

        This is hanging over their heads like Pigpen’s cloud. Then when erased, and unlimited amount of Algo trades can proceed.

        What do you bet?

        • BJ

          I like the 7 year sabbatical better than the 50 LoL 🙂

      3. aljamo

        I’d like to see the stock market plunge to zero and all of these crooked swindlers go to jail for life. Justice served.

        • Kevin2

          The market drops because people sell. JP Morgan the firm, and their chosen clients would be out with pension funds and little guys and gals holding the bag. What needs to happen, as a first step, is the reinstitution of Glass-Steagall in its 1930s form (before it was watered down from the 70s on by reinterpretations) and before it was completely eviscerated by Bill Clinton. Much of what is nearly unethical was felony illegal at one time. The Justice Department needs to hold the white collar financiers legally accountable like Jon Corzine who used (stole) depositors money W/O permission. Jeff Sessions, in 1950s logic would rather arrest / convict some kid for an ounce of pot. Many people depend upon the market for their economic security.

          • Stuart

            Agreed.
            Glass-Steagall needs to be re-enacted. Idiot bankers were responsible for the last meltdown. Why would anyone believe they would see the next one.

          • Stuart

            “Jon Corzine who used (stole) depositors money W/O permission.”

            Funny how that works isn’t it…..
            It literally pays to be a Democrat.

        • BJ

          Jail? I want their, their childrens, grand childrens and employees heads on sticks. Wipe their kinds seed from the earth.

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