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  • Clarocet for Kids
     

    Report: Store Inventory Levels Reduced Nationwide: “Stock Up Now While You Can!”

    Jeremiah Johnson
    January 29th, 2016
    SHTFplan.com
    Comments (304)
    Read by 45,794 people

    inventory-collapse2 inventory-collapse

    Sometimes good comments are worth an entire article.  This author is a big believer in the fostering of good, intelligent dialogues with commenters on these various alternative media sites.  We all have the ability (with comments) to function in the manner of unofficial reporters.  The nation is huge; however, the distance is nominal and the situations that arise in the nation as a whole can be chronicled and reported by we, the average citizens.  The comments and interactions are a means to that end.

    In this light, I wish to ask you, the Readership to report on this important topic in order to present others with the situations taking place in their locales.  The topic referred to being declining inventories and a lack of purchases to meet with customer (I despise the word “consumers”) needs in terms of foodstuffs and nondurable goods.

    I came across two excellent comments upon Steve Quayle’s website that bear reading, as these are two people with experience in retail marketing, inventory, ordering, and purchases.  Take a look at these:

    #1 (From DJ, January 24, 2016)

    “Steve-

    [Regarding the] alerts about the current state of the RR industry. This is in line with what I’ve been noticing as I visited our local/regional grocery store, Walmart, and Target this week in WI. I worked in big box retail for 20 years specializing in Inventory Management. These stores are all using computerized inventory management systems that monitor and automatically replenish inventory when levels/shelf stock get low. This prevents “out of stocks” and lost sales. These companies rely on the ability to replenish inventory quickly from regional warehouses.

    As I shopped this week and looked at inventory levels I was shocked. There were numerous (above and beyond acceptable levels) out of stocks across category lines at all three retailers. And even where inventory was on the shelf, the overall levels were noticeably reduced. Based on my experience, working for two of these three organizations in store management, they have drastically/intentionally reduced their inventory levels. This is either due to financial stresses/poor sales effecting their ability to acquire new inventory, or it could be the result of what was mentioned earlier regarding the transporting of goods to these regional warehouses. Either way this doesn’t bode well for the what’s to come.  Stock up now while you can!”

    #2 (From a Commenter following up #1 who didn’t provide a name, January 26, 2016)

    “I’d like to tailgate on the SQ Alert “based on my experience…” regarding stock levels in big box stores. This weekend we were in two such stores, each in fairly isolated communities which are easily the communities’ best source for acquiring grocery items in quantity.

    I myself worked in retail (meat) for thirty years so I know exactly what a well-stocked store looks like, understand the key categories and category drivers, and how shelves are stocked and displays are built to drive sales and profits. I also understand supply chain and distribution methodologies quite well.

    Each of the stores we were in were woefully under-stocked. This time of year-the few weeks following the holidays-is usually big business in groceries and low stock levels suggest either poor ordering at the store level, poor purchasing at the distribution level or a purposeful desire to be under-stocked.

    Anyone familiar with the retail grocery industry is also familiar with how highly touted “the big box store’s” infrastructure is. They know exactly when demand is high and for what items and in what quantities. It is very unlikely that both stores somehow got “surprised” by unusually high demand. It is reasonable then to imagine that low stock levels in rural areas with few options is a purposed endeavor to assure that both the budget conscious and the folks in more remote areas are not fully able to load up their pantries.

    Simply put I believe the major retailer in question is doing their part to limit the ability of rural America to be sufficiently prepared. Nevertheless, we are wise to do our best to keep ahead of the curve. God bless your efforts, Steve.”

    Now, both of these two guys have a lot of experience regarding inventory and supply at the retail level.  The comments fall upon the heels of the railroads in the U.S. suffering declines in revenue to match a corresponding decline in the shipments of goods and containers.  As of this writing, the BDI (Baltic Dry Index) is down to 317; this alone should be substantial cause for alarm.  We are seeing supplies disappear in the stores because of the plummeting BDI and the oil companies defaulting due to the plunging price of crude.

    What are you seeing in your immediate area?  What is going on in the small grocery stores (if any are left) regarding prices and supplies of food and nondurables?  Those of you with experience in retail, distribution, and trucking…what are you seeing out there?  I urge you to report on what you are seeing and what is happening where you live…in rural and urban areas.  All are interrelated and all are important; your comments and observations are keys to presentation of the whole picture and are both welcomed and valued.


    Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne).  Mr. Johnson is also a Gunsmith, a Certified Master Herbalist, a Montana Master Food Preserver, and a graduate of the U.S. Army’s SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape).  He lives in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with his wife and three cats. You can follow Jeremiah’s regular writings at SHTFplan.com.

    This article may be republished or excerpted with proper attribution to the author and a link to www.SHTFplan.com.


    Also Read:

    The Prepper’s Blueprint: A Step-By-Step Guide To Prepare For Any Disaster

    Forced Economic Free Fall: “The World Is About To Enter A Global Depression Unlike Anything Seen Before”

    Fall Of The American Empire: “They Intend To Collapse the Financial System”

    The Powers That Be Have Lost Control: “Everything Is Falling Apart Everywhere”

    Analyst Predicts Massive Bailouts For Main Street: “Money Will Be Printed Out Of Thin Air And Given To You”

    The Six Laws of Survival: Strategies For Beating the Worst Case Scenario

    Click here to subscribe: Join over one million monthly readers and receive breaking news, strategies, ideas and commentary.
    Advanced Tactical Gas Mask
    Please Spread The Word And Share This Post

    Author: Jeremiah Johnson
    Views: Read by 45,794 people
    Date: January 29th, 2016
    Website: http://www.shtfplan.com/

    Copyright Information: This content has been contributed to SHTFplan by a third-party or has been republished with permission from the author. Please contact the author directly for republishing information.

    304 Comments...

    Vote: Click here to vote for SHTF Plan as a Top Prepper Web Site
    1. KY Mom says:

      The Baltic Dry Index has dropped to 317 today.

      Dry Ships dot com

      • Thanks KY Mom — I’ve updated the article to reflect the new BDI.

        • Braveheart1776 says:

          Mac, that new BDI level may be sending me back to the BOL early. I’ve been shopping all week and I’ve noticed less on the store shelves than before. Never been this bad ever.

          • Cara says:

            I am not much of a mall shopper but of course before Christmas I did my shopping and was surprised by the number of low stocked and empty shelves. I mean the whole shelf was almost empty 2-4 weeks before Christmas. Other areas were very low throughout the stores. It seemed very odd at the time. Normally the extra packed stores at the holidays bother me. Just too much stuff and people and decorations for me to take in. So this year the emptiness seemed very noticeable.

            In my local stores in a suburban area I have been noticing empty spaces. Now that can be normal but I am speaking about abnormally high levels and they don’t get restocked for days. I have never seen that at those stores. I have been seeing this for a couple months but at first I just thought maybe it was nothing. As it continued I wondered. Then I saw the BDI reports. What are the trucking stats?

          • NowTheScreamingStarts says:

            Also, I have noticed stores are now rearranging shelves to make them LOOK fuller, creating an illusion.

            • Anonymous says:

              They have been doing that for a few years. The stores and manufacturers are very sneaky. I noticed major downsizing of pet food at least seven years ago. I call the companies and say Hey what’s up.

        • KY Mom says:

          Mac,

          You are welcome!

          The Baltic Dry Index has dropped quite a bit in recent weeks.

          I believe many will “realize” the impact of this in the weeks to come.

        • I am Friends with a grocery store owner (small family biz.)
          I went by to see them today. They just got notice from their supplier some items were now out of stock until further notice

          • Muddy says:

            Jeremiah,

            I did a post holiday inventory on supplies and found a few things I needed to buy. I went to a grocery club this week only to find the store brand of toilet paper had gone up twenty percent since I purchased in November. For some unknown reason the canned chicken and beef in 12 ounce cans and 5 cans per roll was low in stock. And yet sugar is around 43 cents per pound which isn’t bad.

            However, I’m inclined to think that stores may be doing yearly inventory and so stocks are low until inventory is completed. And the major snowstorm on the east coast may have contributed to low stocks. I’m in the western US and we haven’t had a lot of travel and shipping problems due to weather this winter. As a professional driver who lives near one Wal Mart distribution center and drives by a huge one west of Cheyenne it seems like the trucks are rolling and moving stuff. The amount of freight shipped on trucks is down according to the industry, but there is still stuff moving.

            • Prepared Pastor says:

              I too have a background in retail and have to agree that while inventory is down in some departments, it is no more so in my rural area than January in prior years. I am surprised that stock was replenished as fast as it was after winter storms last week provoked panic buying among 70 million people.

      • Braveheart1776 says:

        Ky Mom, I’ve stepped up my prepping all week. Don’t have enough time to get on here like I used to. Stores in my area definitely have less inventory than usual. Looks like I’m headed back to the BOL early; maybe next week. I don’t like the way things are shaping up.

      • Archivist says:

        The BDI has lost almost 1,000 points since it started its steady decline back in August. That was the same month the Dow dropped and continues on a downward trend, in spite of the occasional rallies.

        • areyouready? says:

          Today from Steve’s alerts:

          Steve, just wanted to drop a line to confirm the economic data you have posted as being spot on.
          As you know I’m in the transportation industry as a owner of a small fleet. I can tell you for sure that I have seen a stunning drop in the freight base. In my case, about 37% off from a year ago. In fact the closest margin in my record show a parallel to 2008. The recent dallas fed numbers in your latest article match what I’m seeing, as Texas is one of my largest freight lanes.
          Many of my friends in the business are telling me they are seeing the same thing. This is in all types of freight. Dry van, flats, heavy haul. Monday, one of my biggest accounts released an available loads list, (one of the largest trailer manufacture in america) the entire list was gone in 7 minutes. This was only the third list this year, normally I get one every other day from this customer.
          Bottom line is I have begun to park all unnecessary equipment, and minimize all I can to prepare to ride out the storm.
          From what I can see, it’s gonna get real ugly this year. I hope all your readers take heed and get ready, if transport collapses, the nation collapses.
          If you got it, a truck brought it.
          God bless and keep you.
          Ken

          • KY Mom says:

            Rationing Begins: Drug Shortages ‘New Normal’ in Medicine

            “…manufacturing issues caused a national shortage. “We essentially did military-style triage,” said Dr. Fitzsimons, an anesthesiologist, restricting the limited supply to patients at the highest risk of bleeding complications.

            Those who do not get the once-standard treatment at the clinic, the nation’s largest cardiac center, are not told. “The patient is asleep,” he said. “The family never knows about it.”

            “In recent years, shortages of all sorts of drugs — anesthetics, painkillers, antibiotics, cancer treatments — have become the new normal in American medicine.

            Many drugs are made by only one manufacturer, so production or safety problems at a single plant can have big effects. For another company to begin making the products and getting them approved by regulators requires the right combination of manufacturing capabilities and economic incentives.”

            “Dr. Unguru, the Baltimore oncologist, recommended that the drugs be rationed based on the ability to save lives or years of life, including curability of a child’s cancer and the importance of the drug in improving the chances.”
            – NY Times

            Drug shortages in American ERs — mostly of lifesaving medicines to treat infectious diseases or poisonings — have increased more than 400 percent

            “Of the nearly 1,800 drug shortages reported between 2001 and 2014, nearly 34 percent were used in emergency rooms. More than half (52.6 percent) of all reported shortages were of lifesaving drugs, and 10 percent of shortages affected drugs with no substitute.

            The most common drugs on shortage are used to treat infectious diseases, relieve pain, and treat patients who have been poisoned. Though the number of shortages fell between 2002 and 2007, they’ve risen by 435 percent between 2008 and 2014.”

            “many factors” may result in product shortages and that they typically happen with “insufficient warning and often [require] significant time and resources to manage.”

            Washington Post

          • Jacknife says:

            Yep, I’m seeing the same thing. Our companies business is down 30% from last year. We are a very big company and move a lot of freight on the rails. Most of our part time dock is sittin at home and a lot of full time drivers are working the dock so they can make 40. Not so long ago we could get 50 hours+ per week with no problem. The rail yards are filling up with empty containers and not getting cycled back into service. Me thinks things are gonna get ugly soon. I mean really ugly.

          • Marie says:

            I live in a small town in the country in NY state. Recently twice when i went to get water the shelves were all empty of the big gallons. Just the smaller ones were there. Did not check or notice other foods but i will next time.

        • Vicky says:

          Yes, forgot that the Meijer store in Lima was understocked and didn’t have many vegetables. Fresh produce is becoming a problem in Ohio. I have my own, canned, but am about out of potatoes and onions. Meijer had five 10# bags which didn’t look so hot. Also, not cheese there. What’s with cheese????

      • Acid Etch says:

        40% of Germans want Merkel’s ass out. The other 60% are brain dead.

        We are fighting an uphill battle.

        As long as the media and academia are run by fuckwits we will continue to lose.

        I am inspired by the Boers’ great trek inland to get away from the fucking British.

        We need our own separatist enclave that is white and right.

        Liberals are destroying America right in front of your eyes.

        This can be easily fixed but we got to have control over the schools. Free from government issued teaching licenses and certifications.

        3% of college graduates have completed courses in economics.

        That number needs to be 100%.

        • Frank Thoughts says:

          Agree: we need to sue the world courts to acquire white European homelands to protect and preserve European people and their culture. At present rates, they will be wiped out in 20 to 30 years (just do the math on global population rates and where that is occurring).

          I am proposing we establish Odin’s Land stretching from Iceland across Northern Europe to Russia. This would be a homeland set aside for white people. It would be a beautiful place, the best in design, excellent food locally sourced, and the most beautiful women on the planet and the best standard of living. Odin’s Land would have special status for the best to come and work there, mostly women from Asia and Central Asia. These are the groups who live best with Europeans.

        • Archivist says:

          “That number needs to be 100%.”

          Not if it’s the economics they taught when I went to college. They teach from Samuelson, who is Keynesian. It was hard to follow the teachings because they were so far from how the real world works, at least after the first chapters on supply and demand. I finally gave up on it.

          Austrian economics is how the real world works. If they would teach that, it would be great. But fat chance of that ever happening.

        • 2017 will be the year of the devil monster. It’s going to be A very mean year. 2017 BURT!

      • There are fucking evil spirits flying around every where causing lots of problems.

      • Freedom fighter says:

        Guys I work in the alcoholic beverage industry my position is in production. I get to see way out in time in terms of demand based on preprogrammed protomotions with the big box stores nationwide. If they need I make it! Also these programs are set up 6 months sometimes a year in advance. Or industry is believe it or not really shielded from recessions etc. In a recession people keep drinking they just drink cheaper priced products.

        Now on to sales which has been really scary.

        1) Christmas and New Years are by far the industries largest selling periods. We sale about 30% of our yearly sales in November and December. Last Decembers sales were horrible! When I say horrible I mean worse then in 2008 and 2009! It’s really liked the floor literally fell out from under us. Sales we bad on all categories and prices not just the high end stuff.

        2) Moving on into Januaury 2016 sales have not recovered. While not as big as December, January usually is a pretty good month with many distributors reordering from the holidays sales. Right now we are trending about 40% off from the same period last year,

        3) Forecasts from the big box stores have also been revised down as well. Based on this fact we have now scaled back our production cycle by one shift.

        4) I have been in the business for 30 years and had not really ever seen such a large drop so fast. While it could be some weird blip in terms of overall sales I would say that it’s likely not given the period of which the sales are down and the downward revisions from the box stores.

        People always drink in god times and bad so it’s not that everyone decided not to drink anymore I think it’s because people really don’t have the money to spend. If that’s the case then we are all in trouble.

        • Philosopher says:

          FF: thanks for the on-the-ground live reporting! The only things I buy now are food and supplies. Oh and PMs. Stacking silver. That is it. If I don’t need it I wait and search on Craig’s List. I am looking forward to the spring and summer garage sales this year! I plan on driving around with a stack of cash and am planning on asking people if they have what I want to buy.

        • Johny Comelately says:

          Could the decline in sales be due to an increase in home brewers? I used to buy a case of beer every few weeks. Now I brew 80% of what I drink. My dad makes wine, so I don’t buy much of that either anymore.

          Needless to say, what you are telling us is concerning.

      • I hate this fuckin planet we live on. it’s now called A OOOOONET! It’s not called A shit ass earth. It’s now A shit ass OOOOONETT!

      • MARCUS says:

        under 300 now and sliding.

    2. Braveheart1776 says:

      Everyone, get what you can while you still can and ASAP! That’s what I’ve been doing all week long. Stores in my area definitely have less inventory than they normally have. Looks like I may be going to the BOL early. We’ll see.

    3. Robin Sage says:

      not storing anymore food..we wont get to eat it anyways

      the Feds will make sure of that

      • Braveheart1776 says:

        Robin, someone will take your food only if you let them. That food is for you and your family, not someone else. do whatever is necessary to prevent someone from taking it from you, even if it means using deadly force. I know that no one is taking anything from me.

        • Robin Sage says:

          wont get to eat it , because we all will be shot to death

          thats what the Fed goons will be doing to us, especially if they think your armed

          • Down Under says:

            Oh he blinked

            pew pew pew pew pew pew pew pew pew pew pew pew pew pew pew pew

          • Braveheart1776 says:

            Robin, I understand and respect that it’s your decision what to do. I don’t see anything good coming out of just giving in to anyone who has bad intentions toward you. That’s just me. Anyone who attacks me and mine will face resistance and I don’t care what they’re wearing. Badges, uniforms, etc. will all be irrelevant to me.

            • Robin Sage says:

              I understand BH.. but your not going to be given a chance to resist

              if we dont resist now..we never will get that chance

              we will all die in a pile of freetos corn chips , maybe even a case of freetos because we were stacking deep

              • PWYPreach says:

                Nope, I refuse to die in a pile of GMO food.

              • Robin Sage says:

                BH.. should we wait until this shit starts?.. or get a head of it..?

                times a wastin

                ht tp://cnsnews.com/blog/eric-scheiner/law-enforcement-could-seize-semiautomatics-under-ga-bill

                • John_Allen says:

                  RS,

                  I’m getting on in years. I studied most of my American History and Founding Documents of our Republic between 1965 and 1975. And on my own initiative, since then. I just assume everyone knows what I’m about to write; I’m always shocked to find out everyone doesn’t know it. Because AH was gutted since circa 1970, and Civics isn’t taught anymore.

                  Most Americans, including college graduates, can’t name the 3 branches of the Federal Government. They certainly don’t know anything about their rights. The tyrant wants its subjects ignorant.

                  Georgia can pass whatever bill it wants. The 2nd Amendment to the US Constitution is dominant precedent to any state or federal law. Dominant to any state constitution. If someone properly possesses firearms, no legislature can retroactively vacate that, no matter what the pretext. The Constitution can’t be amended by the politicial vermin passing a law.

                  True that, when it gets real they can try anything they want. One might need to meet violence with violence when the tyranny becomes hard edged.

                  Since the fastest way to wind up kneeling in front of a ditch, waiting for that shot to the back of the head is to be disarmed, if I am going to die, I am going to die fighting.

                  And I don’t care who knows it.

                  • sixpack says:

                    I’m finding more often that it’s not that people don’t know they have rights, it’s that they have an attitude like Robin, and they believe the government can do whatever it wants, and they are helpless to stop them.

                    They are basically right.

                    The “Patriot movement” was on the rise after the Bundy Ranch thing happened, but it took a severe beating with this last incident, where LaVoy Finicum was killed. This served to cement the fact that “the government always wins” in the hearts and minds of those people who were watching and hoping. That was the plan.

                    “We can’t let them have hope”

                    I’m wondering when they feds will roll up on Bundy Senior and arrest him. They will, you know – they can’t let one single slave get away.

                    They have to make their point, punctuated by a hailstorm of lead.

                  • Don’t worry about the cops being a threat. When the shit hits the fan they’ll be tearing off their uniforms and running for the hills to save their sorry asses.

              • Braveheart1776 says:

                Robin, I’ll be at the BOL with my family before anyone makes a move on any of us. My whole family are preppers and well-armed. we’ll have advance notice of any unwanted visitors so we WILL have a good enough opportunity to resist. Looke like I’m making my next supply run to the BOL next week instead of March. Damn, I was afraid of this but knew it’s possible. If it’s my time, at least I’ll be taking some of the scum with me.

                • Robin Sage says:

                  History shows otherwise
                  But I hope your right

                  • Braveheart1776 says:

                    Robin, I lost my wife to a drunk driver back in the 80s and we never had any kids. It’s only me and the kinfolk. This is all I have left to live for; fighting the NWO. there’s a good chance I won’t survive the struggle. I’ll die fighting instead of on my knees waiting for a shot to the head. I’m at the point I just don’t care anymore. Anyone who comes to me with bad intentions toward me will end up taking the dirt nap. There is no “going along to get along” with such people.

                  • fishandmud says:

                    Robin : I don’t understand the negative attitude. Americans are a resillant people. Yes, they are sitting back and letting it happen but, as long as they don’t screw with them personnally, nobody is going to do anything. TPTB are really going to screw the pooch when they decide that today is the day. They are going to unleash and awaken the sleeping giant. They think they want all of our weapons and total control but when they open that door, they are not going to be able to shut it. I don’t understand the scared, negative writings. Do you for one minute think their is enough LEOs and military combined to control all the people in America. Everybody has seen the email where 4 states hunting license purchasers constitute the WORLDS LARGEST ARMY, and their is still 46 more states to go. That only factors in hunting license purchases. What about all the other people that own guns. Secondly, have you ever seen our government respond to any emergency in a timely and efficient manor? When was the last war that we won? They can’t get rid of a couple of camel jockies, what makes you think they can remove all of us? Third, all the ebt toting folks are going to be rioting, stealing and terrorizing anybody and everybody they can, and all the LEOs, DHS, and military are going to be busy dealing with them.
                    I guess if you are going to just give up, you might as well go on down to FEMA camp and turn yourself in.
                    I wish you good luck and hope you wake up and figure it out before it is to late.

              • Lord Humungous says:

                Robin….If you want I can come over and take all your supplies now…At least you won’t get shot. What’s your address?

            • laura m. says:

              Robin & B’heart : I heard Steve Quayle say the same thing, we will be shot, gun owners first, they don’t care where the guns are, they want to kill the opposition. Hubby said to quit buying stuff and eat up what we have now. Too much clutter in the room where food is piled up. What shows did you hears this info on? I don’t usually listen to online talk shows, no time. Even if we shoot it out, they will have tactical weapons and full auto. rifles.

              • Karl V. says:

                Divvy up the food and tell hubby to feel free to do whatever he wishes with his half. Secure your half where only you can access it. In fact, give some serious thought to just how attached you are to hubby….. he sounds like a potential liability.

          • PatrioticLeprechaun says:

            Screw that. You stock up on guns and ammo. You fight with every ounce you have.

          • Fuck those evil spirits. They can stay in hell where they belong.

          • laura m. says:

            Robin : I heard Steve Quayle say the same thing, we will be shot, gun owners first, they don’t care where the guns are, they want to kill the opposition. Hubby said to quit buying stuff and eat up what we have now. Too much clutter in the room where food is piled up. What shows did you hears this info on? I don’t usually listen to online talk shows, no time. Even if we shoot it out, they will have tactical weapons and full auto. rifles.

      • Unknown Suspect says:

        I’m surprised, coming from a pseudonym such as yours.

    4. Godsoldier says:

      Gonna hit k mart this wkend cus they are closing the store cheap cheap cheap

      • Godsoldier says:

        Gonna be like a kid in a candy shop in sporting goods

      • got out then says:

        They closed one near us, we went for the huge discounts, found they just jacked up the price only to cut it.

        • God soldier says:

          Yeah true that they do thanks for saving me a trip

        • Winston Smith says:

          Yeah, store liquidations are now being run by liquidation companies who do that sort of thing. Worse yet, there is a no return policy and you cannot open the packages, so these unscrupulous companies will box up broken goods and sell them as new. This happened a lot at the Circuit City liquidation. Lots of people got taken by the company doing the liquidation with no recourse. They were being sold flat screen TVs with shattered screens for 80% of retail. It’s buyer beware, so know the normal retail price of an item before you buy it and if it isn’t worth the risk, avoid it.

          • sixpack says:

            How do they stop people from opening the box? They can SAY they don’t want you to, or SAY that you can’t, but before I’d hand over MY money, I’d open that box, signs be damned. What are they gonna do, kick me out? SO?

          • 10% Off says:

            WS – I heard today on the news that the company who bought Circuit City is trying to bring it back. Stated they would be opening as many as 100 stores by next year. I just don’t see it happening.

        • The Mighty Kevin says:

          They closed a Kmart here but the going-out-of-business prices were crazy – things like $6 for a small pack of makeup applicators that really should have been less than $1. There was a security guard at the door checking receipts, and I told her the only crime here was the ridiculous prices.

    5. KY Mom says:

      “Zombie Ships” – Why Global Shipping Is Even Worse Than The Baltic Dry Suggests

      “One glance at The Baltic Dry Index’s collapse is all that most need to see the painful state of the global shipping industry.

      However, as gCaptain reports, reality is even worse as the boom in so-called “zombie ships” suggests there is no recovery in sight for the beleaguered containership charter market, which is facing its biggest crisis since the 2008 financial crash.”

      “all containership sectors are struggling badly, with owners obliged to accept sub-economic charter rates and pay for positioning costs just to keep their ships busy.

      The revenue earned in charter hire is seen by owners as a “contribution” to vessel overheads, but is often insufficient to cover mortgage payments on the ship.

      Thus “zombie ships”, as they have become known in shipbroking circles, are masking the perilous state of container shipping.”

      Zerohedge

      • sixpack says:

        I have a hard time feeling too sorry for those companies where the owner put himself into hock up to his eyebrows, to take advantage of as much business as he could.

        I’m not talking about the owner who tries to expand a little and mortgages a new vessel – I’m talking about the rich people who start another business using their credit rating from their first business, to fund the next. Where virtually EVERYTHING, including payroll is a debit charged with their credit.

        Pretty much like households do when they max out their credit cards – they find the day arrives when can’t pay, and whine about their pending losses.

        • Braveheart1776 says:

          Sixpack, I always knew there was another reason for me to avoid credit. I’ve seen too many people myself go through that. When you can’t pay the piper, then the piper will take you to the cleaners.

          • Karl V. says:

            BH ~ About 30 years ago, there was an auctioneer in my area who started out very modestly –basically from nothing– and in a fairly short period of time, built up his business to the point where he was a prominent national seller. He handled a lot of top-shelf sporting items such as long arms, rare antique fishing lures, etc. One of his duck decoy auctions set a record high price. I was a runner at that auction and stood on the platform holding the record-setting decoy while people bid. Needless to say, I was very careful…!

            Anyhow, this guy raked in tons of money and developed an impressive international reputation. He was at the pinnacle of his profession. This was in the middle of the go-go 1980s when everything was ‘full speed ahead’. The auctioneer plowed every dime he had into the hyperactive real-estate field, and mortgaged himself to the hilt to buy as much additional property as he could. He was well on his way to being a millionaire many times over.

            Except, of course, that it didn’t work out that way. Real estate tanked. He lost everything and skipped town in the middle of the night. Rumor has it that he took with him whatever money he could lay his hands on quickly, including money from antiques which he had sold for consignors… not bothering to wait around and settle up with them before he bailed out.

            The auctioneer eventually turned up in the Mid-Atlantic region, where he once again started a small auction business. There were still people in his home area who were pretty angry with him, so he kept his distance for quite a few years. By now, just about all of those folks are elderly or deceased, so the auctioneer has felt it safe to venture back onto his home turf. He is still in the auction business; and his website even offers “consulting” for estate planning and property liquidation!

            I watched this all play out first-hand. I knew the guy, worked at some of his auctions, and saw him rise to prominence and financial success. But he got greedy. Success wasn’t enough. He wanted to be genuinely wealthy, with a yacht and a private jet and all that. He was so close that he could taste it; and the temptation was too great to resist…. so he gambled everything he had, and more, by going into debt and buying on credit. And he lost everything.

            This saga made a deep impression on me. It’s one thing to read about such a thing, or see it on the TV news; it’s quite another to witness it personally. The rise and fall of this man taught me a lesson about the lust for riches, and the peril of gambling more than you can afford to lose. ~ KV

    6. Robin Sage says:

      ht tp://thefreethoughtproject.com/revolting-video-shows-cops-dish-rodney-king-style-beating-unarmed-surrendering-man/

      EPIDEMIC!

    7. got out then says:

      We live in one of these rural areas and there is less on the shelves. Last week I had to check the date EBT shoppers are at the beginning of the month and clear out inventory pretty quick. But the stuff we buy every week has been depleted. Vegies especially have been poor quality or completely out. Popcorn has been missing or gone. We unplugged 2 years ago and haven’t looked back. Glad we did too, Off grid takes a lot of work to set up right and we are still working on it.

    8. adam3030 says:

      Selves are full to the brim, don’t no what to say, there packed full of everything.

    9. SpazzInc says:

      Central Minnesota Walmart’s,Targets and Cub foods seem to be shrinking the grocery supplies and adding non grocery items to the area to make it look like they have the same amount of products.The only thing good about Walmart is you can get Beans,Bullets and Band-aids without changing stores.

      • Vicky says:

        Our WMs, within a fifty mile range, have only shotgun shells and very few bullets. No 22 magnum and very few 223. For some reason, the cheese section is poorly stocked, both shredded and chunk cheese. ???

        • Archivist says:

          Our Wal-Mart fails to stock large blocks of cheddar, only the high-priced 8 oz. blocks. That’s another reason I don’t go there for groceries.

          We have three different grocery chains besides Wal-Mart. We just mostly buy what’s on sale at the best price. For example, two of the stores never have pot pies for less than $1.00, even on sale. But the third store has them for 79 cents all the time, same size and same brand.

          We never pay full price for anything that we can buy ahead on sale and store until the next sale. About the only thing we buy regardless of exact price is bread, milk, and eggs. And eventually those will be coming out of our own yard or from other people we know.

          • Woogie says:

            Walmart that is far away is an expensive grocery store, only go there because my small grocery stores near me do not stock a few items. If I buy locally at our 2 Co-ops, I get a dividend and 10% back of all I buy there when I turn 65. A neighbor down the road cashed in his and bought a new boat and truck. Not for profit stores give you back the profits. Then there’s another store next to the co-op that has prices up to 40% less than Walmart groceries. I see no shortages here. I haven’t gone to Walmart for 6 months.

      • Bill Gates is A pretty man George Soros is A ugly man Ted Turner is A creepy man.

      • Anonymous says:

        Products hit with the incredible shrink ray too.

    10. Satori says:

      ZIKA UPDATE

      Zika virus transmitted through sex in 2 possible cases – US health authority

      h tp://www.blacklistednews.com/_Zika_virus_transmitted_through_sex_in_2_possible_cases_%E2%80%93_US_health_authority_/48578/0/38/38/Y/M.html

      ZIKA is already in Mexico it WILL reach the mosquito population in the US soon

    11. Low inventory would not be out of tune with the time of year.Its tax time remember? and everyone is doing inventory now for tax purpose, and the less stuff you got the less you pay…

      • sixpack says:

        I guess that could be a contributing factor, yes. It makes sense, but the fact that goods are just not moving like the should, surely only adds to the problem. We’re dying by the death of a thousand cuts…a few drops of blood at a time until we’re dry.

    12. Asshat says:

      Don’t worry there will be plenty of monsantos poison corn for us to eat. See since the cost of fuel has fell by almost half the cost of goods should have fell too. Things are still expensive they haven’t gone down. When they went up in cost the excuse was higher fuel prices. What is the excuse now why no fall in prices. This is why I don’t buy shit people. People say cheap gas isn’t good for economy. Well what the hell is it good or bad. See people consumption should go down but no they keep consuming like sheep they are oblivious to what is going on. Low gas prices are supposed to stimulate business growth and consumer spending. I save $20 a week in gas now. If everyone save 20 how would that help the economy. I wipe my ass with $20. Living wages are the only way. Hang in there if people don’t spend $ increase in wages and extending credit is needed to get people spending again. Horde $.

      • Winston Smith says:

        Don’t hoard $, hoard gold, silver, food, water and preps. The $ is stable now but may not be in the near future.

      • sixpack says:

        Asshat, it depends on how you define “good for WHOSE economy”

        Obviously low prices are good for us poor people, but not so good for the hierarchy of rich people who such the people dry as much as possible. THIS FACT is why it is said that low prices are bad for the economy – it’s bad for rich people who don’t get as much of our money as they’d like.

        That’s Economics 99, which they don’t teach us in class. We have to learn Economics 99 in the school of hard knocks.

      • The Mighty Kevin says:

        @asshat: Quote – “This is why I don’t buy shit people.”

        I wouldn’t buy people made out of excrement either if I were you. Where did you see these so-called “shit people” for sale?

    13. Former Cal Girl says:

      Today, Friday, the thing I noticed was the busy places were the “check into cash” businesses. Regular stores were ghost towns. Even fast food seems quieter than normal. Local grocery store seemed ok, not sure about Walmart haven’t been in there in over a year. K Mart is always poorly stocked.

    14. old76 says:

      is this the weekly or the monthly scare story?, haven’t been reading lately, I know that I’ve read the same story here dozens of times

    15. fupduck says:

      We the people have been declared to be the enemy of the

      State by design. This has been planned from since your

      gramps was little. Nothing is by coincidence and or by

      incompetence. The dumbing down of each successive gen-

      station has left us intellectual paralytics. No one is

      at the wheel and nobody even fucking cares anymore. We

      get the government that we deserve. If so, God help us.

      • Vote Hillary…errr

        Vote Trump…errr

        Vote Sanders…errr

        Vote…uhh…whatshisname with the Goldman Sachs wife…

        I’m sooo confused with all these statist pieces of shit that I think I’ll vote for Ann R. Key…

    16. Gonetoolong says:

      Fucking healthcare folks. That is what is sucking up all disposable income. Higher interest rates, higher taxes, higher healthcare. What the hell did they think would happen? As for stores and inventory, I don’t see a problem. Probably shipping interruptions from the historical snow dump last week. Diversion to stores in most need is prob what happened. Not worried on this one.

      • Enemy of the State says:

        yep agree

        and to add insult to injury .. we are all getting taxed at a higher rate this year too .. so zero fun money anymore

      • Winston Smith says:

        It’s not just healthcare, but rent, cable bills, cell phone plans and food prices. Most people rent and so they are subject to much more rapid increases in housing costs which impacts their disposable income. Around me, my house would rent for about 175% the cost of my mortgage. No wonder no one gets ahead. Now just imagine what will happen when all the sheep who traded in smaller, fuel efficient cars and bought a new large truck or SUV because of low fuel prices suddenly have to pay more for fuel. People are going to run out of room real quick.

      • Yahooie says:

        And isn’t this the year that the tax penalty really kicks in?

        The previous couple of years it was $95 and last year it was a couple hundred. I think this is the year that the full tax penalty will be required from anyone who does not purchase health insurance. Even if it’s not the full penalty, it’s going to kick people in the wallet pretty hard.

        My kick in the wallet is the ever more tightening of what’s covered for prescriptions. A couple of my previous prescriptions are now OTC–and not cheap. A couple of others are not on their formulary list. Since those are the ones that actually work, I pay. Lots of other things are simply not covered until the deductible is met. And this is a decent health insurance through my employer.

        I imagine others face the same. And, yes, it does eat up money I would spend on other things or invest in something.

    17. markinaz says:

      Those of you with experience in retail, distribution, and trucking…what are you seeing out there? I urge you to report on what you are seeing and what is happening where you live…in rural and urban areas.

      Well here ya go J.J. and the rest of you all here, just a little first hand knowledge HEADS UP.

      I’m in Casa Grande, AZ. Here in C.G. there is a large Wal-Mart Distribution Center. My friend drives for CR England that has the contract with Wal-Mart to deliver their goods (meat and produce). This pre holiday season (2015) CR England did not procure SURGE drivers to handle extra loads. Also told the drivers absolutely NO Time Off during this period til the first of the year and that your 2 day rest after your 72 hour work week will be cut to 1 day. During this time period his loads were light and he got a couple 2 day rests after his 72 hour work week because there were not enough loads. After the first of this year his loads are light and he is getting NO loads.
      So in conclusion Walmart in Arizona is doing LESS (meat & produce) stocking of their stores. From what I see looks like things are getting tight with consumers and that is with just ‘meat and produce’ the main stays of life.
      So do what you will and may the good Heavenly Father look down upon you and yours with great blessings.

      • Red Hawk says:

        well if they keep killing ranchers ,or trying to steal their land, they wont have any meat to ship anywhere

        • sixpack says:

          AIN’T THAT THE TRUTH! TO all of the people who spewed such venom at the Oregon Refuge incident, I hope they do find NO meat, produce, leather items and so on. They have no idea how much of their lives depend on those ranches and ranchers that they loathe so much.

          Without beef, in addition to bare store shelves, there will be no more mcdonalds, wendy’s, taco bell, most restaurants, no more leather shops and leather shoes, coats, purses, etc…only for the rich who can afford to have their desires imported from another country.

          Personally, I BELIEVE THIS IS JUST ANOTHER METHOD OF ROBBING AMERICANS OF OUR LIVELIHOODS. The same as off-shoring industrial jobs. Local farming and ranching are not vulnerable to being off-shored. and THIS IS THE ONLY WAY TO BE RID OF THOSE JOBS.

          The idiot public has to do it themselves.

          OMG we live in a STUPID country.

      • Winston Smith says:

        I have a friend who is an owner operator and he reports that the number of loads have decreased dramatically over the last 6 months. So, it’s not just one area. It’s nationwide.

    18. Jim in Va. says:

      Did we forget that we had a weeks notice on a major smow event? Everybody hauled butt to the store and laded up. Stores are cutting on help right after the first of the year which happens every year. This happens every snow event and many of the employees cant get to their work due to snow. Payroll picks up again in March and stock conditions do to. In my area the stores were wiped out but the staffers are working overtime to get the stores back in shape.
      if the trucks don’t get in,there is nothing to stock. If there is nothing on the shelf you can’t sell space. I was in the grocery business for 30 years…chill people!

    19. Anita says:

      I believe that the lack of stock in stores are due to the shrinking economy. My husband sells tractors, and his boss is freaking out about how much inventory they have and are scrambling trying to get rid of it before it all falls apart. So I believe the retailers are trying to save money as well and not get stuck with too much stock.

    20. Sgt. Dale says:

      If you don’t have your stock pile ready and you are just adding to it. You are about 1 year behind the times.

      OT
      Gun show in Princton Ill. at the Fair Ground. Hoping to pick up a new M1A Scout to replace all my guns that fell into the hole after the earth Quake. If I don’t find one I have a couple on Gun broker I’m watching. This is going to make the best Birthday present I have gotten in years. 62 years young. Come on S.S. I paid into you guys for 46 years time to pay me back!!!!

      Sgt.

    21. Sara says:

      Had empty meat shelves a few weeks back (Missouri) with sign saying shipping from holiday and reported shortages at TWO meat providers were the cause.
      People were just staring open jawed at the empty meat coolers.
      A few months ago it was coffee shelves empty to “change packaging” they came back smaller and for a few weeks the prices reflected the smaller packages. We are now OVER the price of the old, bigger packages for the “cute” new tiny ones.
      PLEASE note all the shrinking sizes and SAME (regular or “old” size) prices! A great example are paper products; my new FOUR ROLL toilet paper is a smidge bigger than the original toilet paper roll of -10 year ago. Why don’t we drop all the multi roll poo (pun intended) before we end up with a “10 rolls-in-one” travel size roll! COME ON, we must have all noticed by now! And if tissue boxes get any smaller we might as well just go to travel packs of those too! 3 size changes in 12 months! Come on! Save ink on your box drawings and give me some tissues!
      End rant. :)

      • Stop using toilet paper and stop taking showers. I went last year with only 4 showers and I’ve only had 1 so far this year.

        I’ve been living without modern conveniences more and more. Not too long ago, there was no such thing as toilet paper and sewers.

        And I don’t care if I stink because it helps keep people away from me – which is an added bonus.

      • sixpack says:

        Every time the “change packaging” what they really mean is downsizing the product, hoping no one will notice. They usually put everything on major sale just before they do it, to be sure they got rid of as much of the old package as possible.

        That’s where preppers will catch them with still hanging on to the old packaging—happens every time.

      • Jim in Va. says:

        Sara; and that is how the government says there is no inflation. Manufacturers are changing the size of all grocery products. might as well go to Costco.

    22. John WV says:

      Walmart must have hired a 3 year old child to manage its inventory.
      Our Walmart is “always” out of product, items that I use to buy every month.
      They are losing so much money/sales, by always being out of stock.
      Question is WHY????
      Take your pick: WW3, Planet X, Meteor impact the Ocean.

    23. HelenWheels says:

      I’ve noticed my local Walmart and Kroger stores (southeast of Nashville TN) have had less product on the shelves or no product. What is on the shelves is pushed forward to mimic the appearance of full shelves but often there are only 1 or 2 cans deep in a row.

      I’ve had some fairly good luck with ordering basic food online from Walmart, although even there, quantities are limited. And some of the items have arrived damaged (who in their right mind packs 4 cans of shortening with 4 cardboard containers of oatmeal in an oversized box – quite the mess).

      The convenience of having the food delivered is that they come in Walmart boxes without any identification as to the content, and my local community doesn’t see me wheeling a buggy around with 15 3-pack cans of chicken, 50 lbs of rice, 30 lbs of pasta, etc.

      I’ve been hitting the stock up in overdrive, and not just for food. I’ve also worked on bringing my medical supplies to a higher level, adding candles, matches, rechargeable batteries, hygiene and laundry supplies also.

      I fear the times that are coming.

    24. Jeremiah, this is pretty subjective on my part because I have no hard data. However, two weeks ago on Friday I had occasion to drive from Kansas City to Chicago. My route took me north on I-35 to I-80 to I-88 and then I-39. Normally these Interstates are clogged with truck traffic. This time they weren’t. There was some truck traffic but it seemed to me to be vastly reduced, for what it’s worth.

      • TLBaby says:

        Y’know, I hadn’t thought about it, but when I drove from GA to VA and back after XMAS I didn’t see that much truck traffic. Usually they’re pissing me off constantly passing each other at .01 mph difference in speed.

      • Philosopher says:

        FB: the last couple times I have driven to the closest big city on the interstate I was surprised at the lack of traffic. This was about six months ago. I don’t go into the city unless necessary. It used to be terrible, as far as traffic, getting in or getting out. Last time I cruised through.

      • Sara says:

        Me too. Drove from Mid Mo to almost tri-city TN (as north east as one can get) and there was very low semi traffic…?

    25. I can also testify that the same things are being seen here in Florida. On a regular basis over the last few months, we have not been able to get everything we went to the store for. The local super Walmart seems to always have large gaps on their shelves and not just oddball items, but everyday items that everyone buys. Items like tuna, coffee and pet food. We always have ample supplies at home, but as we take things out of our pantry, we add them to our shopping list to replace. My stepson is fairly high up in a large national trucking firm and he tells me that a lot of his drivers are on the verge of loosing their rigs, because they can not get enough loads to pay the bills. They ship mostly large items, lumber ETC on flatbed trailers and things just are not moving.

      • sixpack says:

        Stores here in Gresham Oregon (a suburb of Portland) have been creatively faced to make it look like there is more there, when there isn’t. Three weeks ago, the meat dept was about half bare. The bins of prepackaged deli cheeses were about empty and the milk coolers were almost empty. Locally sourced products were still there, but not the other stuff.

        On a brighter note, Progresso soups which are about $3 a can were on sale for .99 each – and I loaded up, baby!

        My split peas bins are FULL, as is my other bulk dry goods. My freezer is groaning under the weight and I’m looking for some 2X2s to shore up my canned goods shelves.

        My water is full and a roof catchment system is ready to go when it is needed.

        My pet’s needs are taken care of for at least 2 years, but I’ll take as much as I can get, for as long as I can get it.

        THIS, I am ready for.

    26. Joseph says:

      I am in the trucking industry and specialize in Super Heavy loads. Oil and energy nationwide. Freight slowly tapered off in the 4th quarter. Since the first of the year everything has just stopped. I am hearing the same from the competitors as well.

    27. m rapp says:

      …..never EVER trust anything from Steve Quayle or allnewspipedream et’all…….these people only publish letters that agree with their agenda, quayle in particular EXAGERATES like there is no tomorrow..be honest, look back at how many times the “GATES OF HELL” have opened…..”blue pickup trucks with Russian Spetsnez were stalking veterans to kill them….on and on never in 20 years has ONE of his/their stories played out…nothing ever………do not call me a troll I am well aware of the dangers the corrupt government and the end times ALL TRUE !!! but these guys twist it on a daily basis to sell something and make money off of other peoples fear…..sick and wrong never is there a story about the REAL crises and how to prepare ! all distraction all the time and GREED driven news

    28. I am friends with a grocery store owner. I went in to get a few things at lunch time today while there they got notice that some items were going to be out of stock until further notice

    29. Anonymous says:

      Last night I went into a Marshalls in Connecticut. The store was half empty. I asked if they were closing. The employee said no we just haven’t had a truck come in a while. I’ve never seen Marshalls look like that and be so light on goods. I mean there was rows of empty racks, empty shelves.

    30. old geezer says:

      I retired from a major LTL trucking company about a year ago. My son is currently a city driver there now. They have about 75-80 city drivers that operate out of that terminal daily. My son told me that yesterday they only had enough deliveries to send out just 26 of the drivers, some others were sent out for pick-ups and about 15 were told just to stay home. Now I can believe Obama, and tell my son that he is peddling trash, or I could believe my son told me the truth. I think I know who I’ll listen to.

      • sixpack says:

        That’s easy – oblahblah is peddling trash.

      • Anonymous says:

        Thanks. I think I’ll scratch the chill out advice some give on here.

      • 10% Off says:

        Old Geezer –

        I currently work for a major LTL carrier. I work at one of the biggest hubs. I deal with all locations in our district. Some are busier than others.

        Just my opinion, but I think we are getting more business from some of the smaller companies that are going out of business or can’t afford to haul for lower rates. I feel for the independents who have their own fleet. I don’t see the levels picking up to where they have been anytime soon.

        This economy has been artificially propped up since 2008. There are so many underlying factors that will cause a bigger downturn coming soon. Record debt, mainly part-time jobs being added, higher costs for necessity items, etc. Most Americans are too distracted to realize what is about to happen.

    31. TEST says:

      I’m confused. So there is low inventory? So what? If there is an issue with transportation, etc. do to lack of fuel, massive drought, etc. that is one thing. But in this case, where they just say there is low inventory, so what??? If there are no other issues, it just means people will have to be hired sooner rather than later to help create the necessary goods that got depleted.

      I haven’t noticed any problems in any stores I have been in. Now, the experts here may say that is because they are masking thing. But again, unless there is a SYSTEMIC issue – which this article doesn’t indicate – so what?

      All this being said, there could come a time when there IS a systemic issue, so I’m NOT saying to not be prepared!!

    32. I work in the pharmacy at CVS. We are constantly out of drugs.So many are on manufacturing back order. Our business is way down,and people can’t afford a lot of the drugs. Our shelves in the store are stocked once a week. Our local Walmart shelves are bare way more these days. You can tell the local economy has really slowed down here in the mountains of Western North Carolina. Time to prepare !

    33. AzDesertRat says:

      I work in aerospace machining/assembly, supporting mostly Boeing/Airbus civilian platforms. The big push from our corporate office since Jan. 1 is “Inventory reduction!” They are trying to clear out the warehouses as much as possible.
      It has gotten to the point where our company president told me point blank that he knew we had to keep minimum stock on shelf due to contractual agreements, but that he/we had our marching orders. They would rather take the risk of getting audited by our customers and financially penalized for NOT meeting the minimum shelf requirements, per contract, than have the inventory on shelf.
      I’m also seeing a lot of our customer deliveries being pushed further and further into 2016, to the point where it has impacted our Q1 financials already (29 days into Q1).

      • sixpack says:

        I thought Boeing would be booming, with all of the bombing going on in the middle east.

      • rellik says:

        I’m not sure of your location, but in King and Snohomish counties in WA state have really nasty taxes on inventory. I worked over twenty years at Boeing and remember when they brought in JIT manufacturing. My brother still suffers under this system.
        It makes sense to the MBA’s but plays hell on the system when the weakest link in the chain breaks.
        Food delivery is a lot less complex than assembling an aircraft, but an airplane that is a week late, isn’t as bad as our babies not eating for a week.
        Food chain is modeled on the manufacturing chain. That needs to be re-thought. Food should not be taxed, and a backup inventory should be encouraged for our whole society. Here(this site) we prepare, the Monsters that rule over us should take a page from our book, if only to preserve the animals that vote them into power.

    34. I work for a large multi-national that services many big box retailers as well as grocery stores. I’m in different stores every single day. Everything from their distribution centers to the corner market.

      The DCs are running light. Reduced truck traffic. Many of the pallet racks are empty. While it was not unusual to see a reduction of inventory post holiday season, I’ve never been witness to isles having completely empty racks.

      The stores are light too. Haven’t seen any that have out of stock items, but the shelves may only have product one or two deep on them. Ethnic specialty foods (Kosher, Asian, and Hispanic foods) seem to not have this issue.

      There are Asian market chains here in California like “Ranch 99 Market” (they’re in other states like Nevada, Washington and Texas) that do not seem to have a supply problem. Their shelves are always fully stocked. Also stores (like FoodMaxx) that are not premier stores (like Safeway, etc) are also fully stocked.

      People may need to adjust their shopping accordingly to complete / maintain their preparations.

      I’m located in Central California and travel all over from the SF Bay Area to Yosemite.

    35. Maggie says:

      I have been noticing here in NE Indiana inventories low to none of various items. Sometimes 4-6 feet of shelf space empty. Employees say they don’t expect shipment of that particular item for the foreseeable future, etc. I have noticed this at Kroger’s, Aldi’s & Walmarts. Walgreen’s is giving my father only partially filled Rx for the month (very common drugs)because they don’t have enough. I asked about inventory control, but get a blank look. Since he no longer drives a family member must make the repeat trips there. His insurance does not have a mail order plan. I have been stocking up to the best of my ability.

    36. Anonymouse says:

      Is it possible that these shortages are due to the stores switching to trucks from RR and just taking too long to figure out the logistics? Low gas prices should encourage truck deliveries. Idiots in higher management could also explain why there would be shortages on the east coast after a major snowstorm.

      Personal savings shouldn’t be up if there are shortages in stores though.
      None of it makes much sense.

    37. Thor 1 says:

      Going to store soon, will see what things look like. If we are shipping oil out of the USA,we are in deep dewdew. With the cheap price of oil they are not making a profit which means they are getting what they can. Thoughts on that???

      • Yes, they are getting what they can for their crude.

        Peak oil means there is little demand and there will never be more pumped than now.

        It doesn’t mean the world is running out of crude oil. It means no one will be able to afford to buy it. They will all be broke.

    38. Frank says:

      I shop at an air force base commissary. I am retired and notice that all the best fruits and veggies on the military installation are far superior that what you see down at wally world. Just an observation.

      • Anonymous says:

        Yeah Frank, Military Bases hurt local economies cause these Warwhores pay no sale tax at the BX. The city of Tampa Tampa looses about $17 Mil a year in local Taxes cause some SOB MIC contractor gets that far contract at MacDill AFB. We need to shut down half the shitty bases here in the States. Fn deadbeats. StOP Rewarding FAILURE. Anything to bribe the whores to fight needless costly wars.
        Fuc U.

        – WWTI..

        • Sara says:

          @Frank, opposite here, base shelves in the Midwest are stocked with ROTTING/moldy food much the time. Can’t even buy a banana that isn’t black in the center. WalMart has the better quality.
          From soft, squishy onions, to good looking apples that have rotten cores when cut open, to moldy berries and salad greens that look like dark green snot in the center of the container… molding berries are the worst offender…I’ve had to toss so much food after getting it home and opening rotting “fresh fruit” its ridiculous! I have literally WATCHED stockers set out “new” stock that is covered in mold.

          Oh and @Anonymous, we pay what you pay, we just have our “tax” taken out under a different name than “tax”.

          FYI, I can’t even afford to shop at a military PX/BX…literally…at all. I also, only buy about half my groceries from the commissary. Top 5% enlisted pay scale income, BTW. It costs too much and the quality is poor.

          ALSO, when you have service members working 12-18 hour days and do not make enough to feed their families and they are all on WIC and Food stamps, well, “deadbeats” are the ones who WONT pay for their military.

          You want to know WHY the public might not be “safe” from its own “protectors”? One reason might just be to allow elected officials to work them to death, starve their families and then call them DEADBEATS and whores.

          • Sara says:

            …don’t even get me started on the chocolate…

          • Yahooie says:

            Sara, I can confirm what you say about service members having to use WIC, etc. Years ago, I had a job in the school system reviewing the applications for free and reduced lunch. I was appalled at the amounts the service members made for what they do.

            When my son was in Boy Scouts, we were in a troop on Fort Belvoir. The service members I got to know were hard working people. They weren’t rich (neither was I) but all sons had a good time learning things in the scouting program. Launched a good number of eagle scouts too.

    39. Location: SW Pa. Local Walmart was well stocked as of yesterday. Very few produce bins were empty. Giant Eagle was well stocked also with plenty of produce. Local railroad siding has been storing dry bulk rail cars for at least 6 to 7 months. Approx 50 to 60 cars. Tractor trailer traffic is on the light side from my observations.

    40. I have been seeing empty shelves or almost empty shelves at both Kroger and Walmart for several months. The latest valentine display is 1/3 empty and 2/3 light. Worse is food is not in stock. Lettuce, cauliflower, radishes, carrots, have frequently been sold out. My Home Depot is low on stock for nearly a year.
      I have increased my gardening space by 4 raised beds and hope for 2 more early in spring. I am dramatically increasing my garden space this year. Saving seeds and going heirloom and landrace varieties, Monsanto is buying up heirloom seed companies and SHTF or not, I do not want their GMO or toxins. Trying for food security as well as stacking.

      • Nopitypartyhere says:

        Seeing the same in MS. Was in SAMs today and other than bulk dry goods, oils etc the stock was made to look plentiful, but really wasn’t. Fresh meat was definitely at a minimum. Especially beef. Now junk food soda and candy was plentiful. There wasn’t even as much water as usual. Now Kroger was well stocked. Other stores not so much.

    41. JBLM Warrior says:

      I was recently contracted to do a job for a rather large trucking company on the west coast. The contractor who I have been working with for a few months is always upbeat happy and full of kool aid. Yesterday was the first time he seemed anxious and a bit worried about the trucking industry. I asked him what was wrong and he stated that his Thursday morning company meeting had their Washington Lobbyist also in attendance and they were notified that the economy is about to “tank.” This trucking company was immediately required to curb all necessary spending. Keep in mind this is a multi million dollar company, who’s parent company is a fortune 500.

    42. Susan says:

      In southwestern Colorado, some of the stores only have
      canned goods 1 or 2 cans deep on the shelves and the remaining shelf is empty behind. We aren’t feeling the pinch too much yet, but know its on way. I’m also seeing fewer varieties of canned goods, etc. If there were 20 kinds of beans, now much fewer, then holes filled in with other stuff not related.(Walmart) I can’t believe people aren’t paying attention.

    43. Phenias option says:

      Great article J.J,I am spreading the word on our 2 meter net and emails, what people are asking is what is driving these store shortages? I tell them the shrinking economy but would like to
      cite a more specific cause any ideas? Thanks for the heads up on this and other topics. Keep
      up the great work, you are making a difference. Keep your powder dry!
      .

    44. I have been wondering about this and so glad to see this article and everyone’s comments. Here in central NM the store shelves have been noticably empty for at least 3 months. It started in Albuquerque when I noticed the local Kroger store would run out of certain brands and days would go by before they’d restock. Another day I notice there was no chicken–I mean NONE–just empty bin. They are putting out less product and shelves all over the store are “lightly filled”. Now I notice my independent rural grocery has 1 or 2 items with nothing behind them,soem shelves are just plain empty, unusual for them since they get a lot of tourist trade. And even trendy high end Whole Foods had a lot of empty shelves and bulk bins just yesterday. Albuqeurque WF and Kroger are in a city of 800,000 so not rural by any means.

      • Hey TMJ,

        I live in Santa Fe County but shop in ABQ sometimes. My shelves out here are very empty. After reading this article this morning, I made a big garden seed order for short season varieties. I was building raised beds before the big snowstorm. When it melts off I am going to finish building raised beds. I prep okay on food and am working a new garden. You take care, NM person.

        • Hi Rebecca,
          Great to hear from another New Mexico person! Yeah, it’s time to get serious about real gardening, not “hobby gardening”! I was at the grocery last night and another thing I noticed is that there is no shortage of chips, candy, soda and junk foods. They have bulk bins, some of which were empty and had a sign saying the bin was empty due to an upcoming “product change.” One thing that is on the grocery shelves – mason jars for canning. I’ll be making on run on those!

    45. Anonymous says:

      Live in forks of 2 the major interstates going through Ky. Have noticed for several months our Wal-Mart’s and Kroger around here inventory low and they are pulling items to edge of shelves leaving over 1/2 the shelves empty behind them even when they restock they never really restock!

    46. Thor 1 says:

      The grocerystores in the southeast are full of food. No problem here. Wander if its just out west or maybe Oregon??? I have heard Martial law is coming next month though!!!

    47. I know that growing your own patch, buying from the locals and canning, dehydrating, curing and smoking are beyond the abilities of the “sheep” but I thought most of the posters on this board would be beyond worrying about what the stores have in stock.

      Better get your nails dirty. Get out of the blue light and into the yellow light and get crackin’

      • Skeptic says:

        Great post JRS. People who come here regularly and aren’t producing any of their own food need to re-think some things.

      • Sara says:

        I tried last year, everything died. And I do mean everything. I even used composted soil and planted from sprouted plants! We have fair to middle soil, it is a bit heavy but only a bit and there was good drainage for my little patch. Dead. Tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, melons, all dead. The microwaving heat in the “persistent contrail” sky didn’t help…

    48. Jim Kroeger says:

      Central Alabama is showing no signs of shortage. Shelves are all stocked as usual. What the heck is BOL?

    49. swinging richard says:

      Sometimes we have to shift our area of focus. If we can not find one thing, we shift to another. There is always a need. We try to be well rounded.

    50. Asshat says:

      The produce everywhere I go looks like shit. That’s why I do a garden I get good stuff and more than I need. I dump perfectly good stuff in my compost pile. I don’t bother to give it away so others can enjoy the fruits of my labor. The thing is food takes energy and labor to produce folks grocery stores throw away good food all the time because they got a truck coming in with fresh stuff. It’s not that the stuff they throw away is bad just they have no room for it. For food just in time delivery is the way for the grocer to go. They are running a business folks and cannot afford to throw hundreds of pounds of food. They have to minimize waste. As long as we can still do our gardens what do we care about the people who can’t or won’t. There was a time that if you didn’t work you didn’t eat. Everybody contributed. Now we have useless eaters only good for a vote for their slave masters. I laugh everytime a fat person says they don’t eat a lot. how did they get so big then.

      • Philosopher says:

        AH: I agree. The produce at my local store is expensive and the quality is not good. I am building some raised beds in the backyard and plan on planting greens, to start. I haven’t decided what else to plant but will probably do snap peas and green beans. I like New Zealand spinach for stir fries. It takes forever to germinate but once you get it going it does fine. Spinach and Swiss chard do well in my area in the spring.

        Does anyone know of a good place or site that tells you how to grow mushrooms? I would like to get some spores delivered. I haven’t grown mushrooms before so this would be new. I am interested in specialty mushrooms. Thanks!

        • DAMed in NY says:

          Philosopher, consider downloading the book by Sepp Holzer called Permaculture, A Practical Guide to Small Scale. This guy has done it for his whole life on the side of a mountain that most would consider inhospitable. He has a whole section about mushrooms. I did a few Swales last year with unusual fruits and nuts following Lawton’s methods, but plan to try the hugleculture this year. I only had to water once during a very dry summer last year for my test patch, and my tomato were better than the ones at my home that received regular attention! The decomposing wood is amazing. I also plan to do some mushrooms this year but they take about a year to get going.

      • Andrea5 says:

        I too grow my own and have loved giving extras away, but I am learning quickly that much of the beautiful stuff I give away gets wasted. People don’t even know what to do with produce. If it doesn’t come in a box and cook up in the microwave it will rot in the fridge. So, I have become very choosy with whom I share my garden with. I would far rather my compost gets it than somebody’s trash can.

      • Old Guy says:

        yep I never sell or give away my extra produce. I feed it to my livestock or compost it. It,s like feeding a stray dog. They will keep coming back. And If a SHTF event happens those you previously willingly shared with. they will come back demanding you feed them.

        • Old Guy,
          I used to routinely give away produce to poor families at church. They got very demanding. I moved to the country and traded produce for good Texas beef. Here I have given produce to the neighbor who never charges when he plows snow for me. I don’t produce much extra yet because I spent most effort at first on fruit trees. I am learning winemaking basics. A lot of my fruit can be stored as wine 😉
          I am so far away from other fruit trees I have to plant in pairs for pollination. That is going to be a lot of fruit some day. I need a cave up hill for wine storage. Just kidding.

    51. I have been aware and pointing it out to my wife for a couple of years. Out of items, shelves faced 1 or 2 deep. I hope it is due to people prepping and throwing their whole system off. I have been telling her for 2 years if you see something we will NEED soon buy it now because chances are it will be out of stock later.

    52. Wolverine says:

      February 10th starts lent, the people that buy meat, snacks and such are going to stop buying these products for 40 days. If you ever wondered how many Christians there are this will give you a good idea. They stop over stocking meats, you grocery or meat markets have sales to get rid of the over stock. The non paying customers (welfare) only spend at the first week of the month , after that it’s cheap beer and cigarettes from the corner store until the next hand out. On the good side, for that month you will get the freshest fish, vegetables, and lots of fish fries ..

    53. Warchild Dammit! says:

      I travel New England for work a bit,supermarkets seem fine and when buying ammo at wally world store shelves at moment seemed full,I would notice if all stuff up front and large empty back spaces,being in building trade just notice that kind of thing.Lumber yards and big box home building stores(great place for cooking supplies)also seem well enuff stocked,just my observations in New England.

      JRS,some folks trapped in cities and excepting small veggie gardens are dependent on stores,at least they are stocking up on something,they have a chance then.Local farms for many just unfortunately not a option,do see a larger interest in small farming/gardening ect.,I find that very encouraging.

    54. Philosopher says:

      I remember the empty shelves and long lines in the old USSR. In the USSA we take a lot for granted. Including that the store shelves will be fully stocked. There was on article on Zerohedge last year about people standing in an empty store and being thrown plastic baggies of powdered milk. It was a mob, a riot, for powdered milk.

      Imagine when people in the US have to line up for food like they line up for electronic junk on Black Friday. Plenty of Amercians are willing to punch or kick another person for a TV. Imagine how will people will act when they have to stand in line for bread.

    55. Trick says:

      Just a few observations from Central Nebraska.
      Shelves in store are mostly stocked with empty slots scattered thru out. Items are not stacked as deep on the shelves. The big box “Menards” has had more 11% off store wide sales in the last year than the previous 10 combined.I guess to keep the cash flowing. Burlington Northern railroad has a major rail line in our area. It hauls mostly coal from Wyoming. There are fewer trains and they are laying people off. My friend who was recently laid off said that the EPA is shutting down coal fired generating plans and there is less demand for coal cars.

      As long as the trucks keep running we have a great resource for fruits and vegetables. It is called Bountiful Baskets CO-OP
      We have a buying opportunity each week. $15 gets us a basket (max three baskets per week) plus any extra case lots we want. I got a case (22 lbs)of pineapple for $14.50 I plan on dehydrating and storing it. A friend bought three cases of cauliflower to pickle.
      This activity gets us through winter until the garden starts producing. We can buy case lots of tomatoes or many other item that can be canned.Check it out they have groups in quite a few states.
      Venison is readily available. The other morning my neighbor called because he needed a tow because his car was disabled from a deer collision. I dressed and butchered that deer and was eating jerky 24 hours later. Anyone can do it if you have a mind to do it.
      My green house extends the growing season up to January and starts back again in March. I have a small acreage with trees that will heat my home and shop way past my lifetime. Get out in the rural areas and contact landowner to get yourself 50 cord of wood stacked up at your home. Most probably will let you have it for the taking if you are responsible and clean up after yourself. Whatever may come at least you can stay warm. I guess I am blessed not living in a city because it is a lot easier to take care of yourself in rural areas.

    56. Scott C. says:

      Canton, OH Wal-Mart on Tusc Ave, the outside storage racks are about 3/4 empty. “Normally” they are full.

    57. Sean says:

      I know every retail store cuts back in January and February. I was a retail manager for 20+ years. Sales are always bad in those two months. February is often nightmarish. No one buys a damn thing in February .
      However, things are much worse than I can recall at every place I have been. As mentioned, Walmart and Target are awful. I have been in two Walmart’s in the last week. In both stores, they were removing entire isles. Combining departments. Many departments were smaller. Also, a lot of shelves were poorly stocked. They didn’t restock some departments after Xmas. Although, oddly, the ammo case was full. Except .22. Prices are down, like every January. Really low in fact. My mom “needed” a new TV(she has dementia, and TV makes her happy). A 32inch TB for $89 at Walmart. 45acp for $13.99.

    58. Plan twice, prep once says:

      Very strange, longshoreman in North East ports walked off the job shutting down hundreds of facilities.

      Even stranger, the news media seems unable to explain why the walk off occurred?

      I wonder if the longshoreman are being hit by a slowdown in incoming goods, and the media doesn’t want people to know about coming shortages of goods?

    59. gwynmarilyn says:

      There are less small food tables in Fresh food area. Also I have found that shelf are further a part. I used the stores power carts so I have found I can turn them around easier then I used in the alleys. Also it seem that they are stocking shelves with large sections of one kind of item which out of the order just to fill up space. Lots of Noodle items which used to only be in soup area. The store look like it has food. But some items are stack in away that there fewer lines of cans good.

    60. Andrea5 says:

      We live in a suburb west of Denver and I feel like this area is an oasis, though only for a little while longer. It is growing ridiculously fast, housing is skyrocketing and it really is becoming unaffordable. But, if you go to the stores, they are packed with shoppers, it is hard to find a parking space, restaurants and bars are busy. We don’t eat out, but everyone we know does and they eat out a lot – like daily.
      I have done quite a bit of prepping lately and have not noticed empty store shelves. I shop primarily Costco, Sprouts, Whole Foods, Natural Grocers and they all seem to be well stocked. But, like I said, Denver seems to be this little oasis. We are just waiting for the SHTF here.
      We are definitely in a bubble here and I fear it is going to pop soon.
      We want out, but where to go????????

    61. Old Guy says:

      Ive got a doozy of a plan B. I will do like Ches McCartney. Harness my goats to a wagon and do a walkabout. Wont bathe shave or change clothes. The stink will keep everyone at bay. LOL

    62. I work for Walmart. They want the backroom empty except for one small section. The backroom steel is mostly for storing pallets of advertised items that will sit in “Action Alley”, and accounting paperwork.

    63. greasemonkoid says:

      I propose the first thing to watch regarding the food supply is dehydrated/freeze dried foods. Food inventory will get low in this industry first.

    64. dave says:

      My wife and I grocery shop in Corvallis OR where we have not noticed any stocking shortages in the stores. Today, however, at the local Trader Joe’s we noticed that the price per pound of the whole chicken brand (Draper Valley) we usually buy had more than doubled from a week ago. Price fluctuations up to 50% might be expected with sales promotions or such but greater than 150% was shocking. Fortunately, another free range brand we have never tried was available at a “normal” price. Something must have happened to the DV supply chain. I can’t wait to see next week’s pricing or if this brand is no longer stocked.

      • Trick says:

        Ever consider raising your own chickens for eggs, meat and barter?

        • dave says:

          Well, yes… but we have not yet had to do so as we have found a local farm fresh supplier, a nice lady with a small farm where she raises everything from ducks and rabbits to cattle. We started buying lamb from her a few months back and are considering pork if she/we can find someone to share a half (even with two fridges, we don’t have the freezer space for that much meat.) Can’t beat her for organic, free range, and trust worthy. The feds want to close down all small farms like hers and force everyone onto toxic corporate food. That’s partly why they are squeezing ranchers off their lands here in Oregon and elsewhere. They mostly want access to the subterranean resources (gold and strategic metals) because I doubt they care if common people starve. If you live in the private sector, you are just another useless eater.

          • Old Guy says:

            we have chickens ,geese, goats ,sheep rabbits & cattle. Ate rabbit and canned potatoes tonite. However if things really go south . and folks are out of food gardening will be out of the question. Back in the civil war roving gangs and army scavengers commonly stole the women and childrens provisions. They showed up just when the crop was ready to harvest or the fattening hog was butchered and placed in the smoke house. livestock and winter provisions had to be well hidden. So we better have a years supply of food stored. and seeds and nucleus of breeding animals hidden someplace.

    65. 2isone says:

      We went shopping in a new “super” Kroger yesterday. The beef area is as small as one of the smaller stores used to be, while the pork area has expanded greatly. Tons of chicken in the center aisle bins, but beef limited and expensive. See Texas.

    66. Silverbuck says:

      North of Mpls., some shallow shelves around , I shop early am after overnight shift every couple days. Ordered 3 Swiss Army Blankets tonight for GP . Elderly father going fast now “ww2 vet” may be checking out at a good time . Looks like it may be time for the rest of us to prove our metal like that generation did .

    67. ben richards says:

      I heard the price of all dairy products would skyrocket in 2016 due to all the cattle killed in the blizzards, my first thought was to snort milk thru my nose, then say “who milks cattle”?,

      • Vicky says:

        Funny response, but there is an art to milking cows. If you pull too hard, they will get mastitis and you have to throw away what you’ve milked, plus the cow will get really sick. Cattle are much smarter, or less passive-aggressive, than horses and don’t purposely hurt themselves on any available object, but they take a LOT of care. Wish I had paid better attention to my father or taken notes. Don’t think the vast majority of beginning preppers know how much work and care is involved in livestock.

    68. windy says:

      No matter how much you stock up it will run out before e any recovery. The things we need to have are seeds and plants for food and medicine and books that teach how to make things we will need.

      If they destroy the surface of the earth will we want to live underground?

    69. Hector says:

      I live in southeastern Florida and do all of my grocery shopping at one or two different Publix supermarkets and what I saw in one of them this morning was something I ain’t never seen before.

      The first thing that I saw when I walked through the front door was a woman pushing a cart, with a young child sitting in the top section, legs dangling, not really smiling much…. I don’t know why this particular scene caught my eye, but it did. And I watched them for a little while. In fact, I followed them.

      For about 15 minutes. For about 15 minutes she pushed that cart through that grocery store but never once did she pick anything up Not once had she put anything into her cart. And I’m thinking….??

      But then I realized that neither had I!

      And what I saw next blew my mind. EVERYone in the store was pushing around an empty cart.

      The shelves were bare.

      There was nothing to buy.

      It was Gone Baby, Gone.

      It was pretty weird.

      Very cool though that Publix would keep the store open and let us do that!

      “Publix, where shopping is a pleasure.”

      .
      Have a nice day, y’all!

    70. I have noticed lots of empty spaces and some items were completely out of stock at walmart all year last year, but they seem to slowly restock and blame the dept. managers. Of course now I can’t remember what they were, one was flavored skoal, not to important to most. Odd how that is the only item I remember. Will start paying more attention now.
      I wish the article would tell us exactly what they found is not being restocked, and I could remember, darn. Just stock up on everything you use.
      Another item that is really causing a hardship is my elderly mom’s blood pressure drugs that went up to $210 in Dec. and now $350 in Jan. for 2 drugs for only 1 month! They say she in in a donut hole for bs insurance coverage, what a bad joke!

    71. Anon in east says:

      I was in a Walmart two days before the east coast blizzard. It is located in wealthy suburb outside a mid sized east coast state. Didn’t need food, just snow gloves for my teenage son who grew 4″ in the last two months. Nothing in my house would fit those mitts of his. We go to one of the 20 open registers (shockingly well staffed) with 8+ customers in each line. As expected, the lines were slow. But not for the reasons we thought. We finally become #2 in line a watch the customer in front of us has several cards declined. Systems were not down & the weren’t using the new coded cards. She finally fished out cash and had one card that worked for the remainder. Cashier apologized for wait. I complimented her on her handling of the situation and she chuckled. “I’ve gotten good at in the last 3 hours. Every other customer I’ve had in my shift has had that same problem.” I was stunned into silence. If this is where the consumer financials really are, then we are in a bad way! If people can’t pay for snow emergency food it’s worse than I thought.

    72. Old Guy says:

      I know a highly intelligent dumbass. The guy has skills and can build and do just about anything. has cattle chickens and goats. Sells eggs and invites total strangers who buy eggs inside his house. When you go inside his place he proudly shows you all his shelf,s bulging with the food they canned. His place is right on the highway. Grows his huge garden between his house and the road. and now he built a smoke house. And placed it right out front for everyone to see. And he is a blabber mouth. goes to church three times a week. He is a target for certain. No way is he ever getting past my front gate.

      • Sara says:

        Let me tell you a secret, those who horde and coldly condemn others to die out of selfish pride will find themselves overcome by what they fear the most. You will starve to death.

        Lean on God alone for your strength and substance. Only God can save you. If you put your trust in the effort of your hands and you shut out those God loves, you WILL see that a swift destruction will befall you.

        When this happens to you, if you’ve been spared your life, drop by your “friends” house. Should he turn out to be a true son of God, you will find that his in-your-face home seems to be invisible to enemy hordes…AND, he’ll let YOU in. May God have mercy on your soul.

        • Old Guy says:

          Ive never read such ignorant religious bullshit in my life. The guy in question is a dumb ass Christian braggart. He is prideful and wants to show off. You are free to rely on god. I haven’t got blind faith that the invisible guy in the sky will do my job for me. My job is to provide and protect me and mine. Part of that is being smart and keeping my preps unknown to the sheeple. Noah didn’t invite everyone aboard the ARK.

    73. redzonehunter says:

      i’m in western ny and my stores seem normal ,prices are still going up but are stocked.i think they had such a bad holiday season that they purposely keeping stock low.i will watch though because sometimes you just dont noyice unless pointed out.

    74. 21Bravo says:

      For dog owners take note: I go to Petsmart to get my dog’s food. On some brands, especially for Senior dog food they only carry 2 bags in stock at all times. I always have at least 6-7 30lb bags available at all times. It is something to consider if one hasn’t.

    75. is it possible that this low inventory is (perhaps in some cases) not a deliberate attempt to undersupply, but because of the difficulties in the transportation industry and also, perhaps reduced sales so why should they oversupply items with an expiration date that would just have to be discarded?

      The economy is tanking, as we all know, and when people have less disposable income they buy less. Of course. What has happened to Christmas season retails sales the past few years? When you get broke enough, not only do you buy less Christmas presents, you buy less food …..

    76. SidewinderNinerSix says:

      The Walmarts in my area are way low on inventory. Anyone else notice on almost every aisle, employees are “fronting” items to make the shelf look full?

      Especially canned and dry goods.

    77. The way I see it, anyone who is not making the effort of learning how to garden, and making it a number one priority, is living in a dream world. Everyone thinks guns & ammo, which have their place, but you can’t eat your weapons. True, sustainable security must have food production, food storage and seed saving at its core.

    78. southside says:

      Fry’s Grocery stores here in Tucson are unusually bare. It felt eerie even walking down the aisles.

    79. southside says:

      @LF: The soil around here really sucks

      • Vicky says:

        Sympathies. Ours does too, and we’ve spent years and lots of money to make it better. It’s still awful. Consider straw bales or raised gardens, which is terribly expensive and there may not be much time left. Can you move anywhere else? Bad ground is very expensive and time-consuming to fix, and even then, it might not get better. Stock up on what you can which seems to be the best idea right now. If SHTF happens, you can probably garden on someone else’s land without too much trouble.

      • Hi southside, unless you just want to move anyway, soil can sometimes be fixed pretty easily. Can you say exactly what Iis wrong? A lot of clay, compacted? Sandy? Toxins? I have “fixed” a lot of soils, hard to find good soil, and farmland can be very toxic. Let me know, I’ll try to think of something.

    80. RetailWorkingStiff says:

      Is it done on purpose? I do not think so. I work in a retail setting. I understand the automatic replenishment system. We have that where I work. Unfortunately, this system is messed up much of the time. Either receiving miscounts up how many items we get from the warehouses, or the items on hand get lost or stolen. However, the few employees on the floor and in receiving have so much work to do, it is very hard for us to report that what we have on hand does not match what the computer says we are supposed to have! I ran into this problem even today. I was working in my very large section, alone, trying to do what I could to reset the entire section for the coming month. I ran into quite a few items where the computer said we were supposed to have X number of items, but I either had way more than it said we have, or I had none. In both cases, if the corporate computer is set to send us more automatically, and the store computer thinks we already have it, guess what? We don’t get more until the error is corrected. And that can take a long, long time. So in small communities, if people are shoplifting and the store is permanently running on a skeleton crew (as it seems my store is most of the time), there really is no way the store can restock itself via computer. The employees have too much work to do as is.

    81. minivanjack says:

      If you see reduced stock in a store, that could be very temporary and insignificant. I am surprised neither of the experienced retailers bothered to interview the managers of the stores they visited. If anyone files such reports in the future, remember that the store manager can easily give you information that can help understand low-stock conditions. We can’t count on mainstream media anymore, we have to be journalists ourselves and dig for the truth and facts!

    82. Lori says:

      I live in coastal NC & both my daughter & I have noticed that product availability is a lot of times either out of stock or just plain very low on stock. When I spoke to my brother about this & asked him the same question about product availability & if he had noticed any differences in if shelves were full or stock was low, he said, “now that you mention it, products are very low, which I find odd”! I just wanted to let you know this as you requested feedback. And by the way, he lives on the west coast!

    83. Christine says:

      We still have a small grocery store up her in north central Wisconsin, but just barely, it just reopened a year ago after being shut down for years. If we want to go to Walmart we have to drive to Michigan to give you an idea of how rual we are.
      The biggest things I have noticed that are low on stock are produce and meat. But being winter up here it’s not too uncommon. I typicality don’t shop the aisles unless I need flour or sugar or I’m hitting a sale. The alcohol department is the best stocked area of the store, our town also has 4 bars, which seems silly in such a small town, but booze is the economy here.
      We recently had a dollar store open in the small town as well, the grocery side of it has had the bare minimal on the shelves but they are competing with the grocery store in a small town. I haven’t gone to the city in Michigan to shop in a while, the Walmart there is chaos, but it may be a good idea to check it out and see how they are doing. I do remember last time I shopped there last month their produce section was deplorable and I went to the smaller SuperOne grocery store to get fresh organic produce. All the stores I have tried have had a shortage of bananas and what they do have is dark green and no where near ripe. I’ll pay more attention when I shop again.

     
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